About me

You are on this site because we are sharing the same passion : Software

My name is Sylvain Leroy and I am software programmern, startup funder. My speciality is to save software from all kind of sickness.

about me

About Me in Switzerland 🙂

What is defining me the most precisely is my passion for Software and coding.

As explained on my company site (byoskill.com), I have three passions :

  • Software craftmanship (SQA)
  • Legacy software migration
  • and startup environments

I have been doing that from so long

I discovered coding something around 10, on our family Commodore 64/128.

Commode 64/128

Commode 64/128

Back in these times, I didn’t know about coding, I learnt how to use it to get what I wanted. Games, interests. I was curious to manipulate and understand this strange creature.

Basic program

Basic program

Of course I had normal activities, friends, sports. However this machine fascinated me. We had two big books, in English, a foreign language to me, full of code listing. I spent numerous to painstakingly type them on this computer. Some code were games, some revealed to be funny noise / sound effects, plane engine.

I had the chance to be from the generation who grew up with computers and incredible progresses. We switched one day to x86, a 286 with single coloured screen. I remember the screen was pale glowing in my room at night. I made obvious progresses in Basic, QBasic, Visual Basic (my college passion),  switched to Pascal(Delphi) at 14 during the middle school. At 16, I was efficient in Delphi and I tried the C language without enthusiasm.

I discovered at the same time ASM/Z80 programming to use on my Texas calculator and I switched from Pascal to ASM, with all the set, TASM, TLINK.

The book “the Art of Assembly Language” had a huge impact on me. I printed it with our good old printer in 4 big binders. And started to love it.

I continued until 18 my experience of assembly programming on two fields :

I finally has switched to C/C++ late 19 using Visual C++. I have been slowly mastering it. I was always tempted to switch to ASM using asm statements. To program with limited resources is so much funnier than with high level languages.

A lucky meeting changed my life and course

I have been following a Computer science diploma in two years at the University of Rennes 1 (Lannion). And then I discovered I could not work in industrial automation because a wrong choice of course. I switched to a general computer sciences Licence (3rd year).

During my master degree, I choose as exam project, a technical project in which we were supposed to write a Java syntactic analysis tool (linter). This meeting with this professor, Francois Bodin, had a influence of my final year of study, and at minimum the next ten years of my life.

Together, under his tutelage, we imagined a research project, a project of company creation, and we launched it. It was Tocea, which lived from 2009 to 2015 before being absorbed by a Software Editor, Metrixware. In my mind; I am and will be eternally grateful, for the opportunity – the seed – Francois offered to me. It has been an  incredible adventure. This environment was totally new for me, my family, my surrounding, given our social origins.

Serenitec : research project

Serenitec : research project

Tocea : my passion, and my initiatory route

Offically Tocea has been created in March 2010 after 3 years of research project and one year of incubation.

Research project Serenitec

Research project Serenitec

We were three at the beginning, and the project was called Navis.

Against, there, Marie-Anne  and Florent, have been of a great help and influenced positively the view of what could be Tocea, both socially and professionally.

Tocea / modele_carte_recto2

Tocea / modele_carte_recto2

A french article here of this period.

Francois Morin, is also important to me, since we brought Tocea to its maturity together. Co-founding a company is never simple. We had to learn from each other, to be able to work together. The stability and the trust of our relationship has been like the warm fireplace that attracts the frozen voyagers. And we simply attract the best to reach together our ambitions as a small software editor we were.

Our company had his life , successes and failures , joy and pain but I remember it as a wonderful social experience. I have seen students coming for their first experience, getting their first job, growing up and becoming our real assets. Tocea has been a success (humanely) thanks our people. They gave us our trust, and we tried together to create something great.

Links :

The transition

Tocea ended peacefully to become a more serious business under the acquisition by Metrixware. Fair enough, Metrixware, a well-known software editor specialized in Legacy system and migrations, saved us at that time, our business was in a full transition after some critical mistakes and a hard business year (for the whole sector).

I learnt much from being there about processes, change management and also company culture. Three things crucial for the success of any projects.

Now in Switzerland

I am enjoying my new road, currently in Switzerland.  I have been discovering this great country and particular job environment since the begin of 2017.

I have been since working full time as IT Consultant for large institutions. Recently, I created a small structure www.byoskill.com in which I am providing my experience for dedicated missions.

Each encounter, with either a Software Developer either a team, is pushing me forward to what I love the most :

Empowering people, saving Software and developing great tools.

 

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The framework is for Spring Framework and requires Java 8.0. The code is on GitHub and downloadable from Bintray or JCenter.

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I have tried Vue.js and I love it

Vue.js Framework

I have tried Vue.js and just love it.

Some weeks ago, I started a new project for which, I have to build an internet website.

Context

After spending really long hours on internet, browsing, collecting every possible testimonials and advices and comparing them to my first impressions, I decided to start with an hybrid / multiple page site.

(if you are interested by the reasons, it will be the subject of another post).

An hybrid /multiple page site is a website where the content is rendered both from server side and client side at the opposition of single page application (SPA) full client side and a classical server side site(PHP..) Since I want to use the power of modern Js Frameworks as double binding, refreshing, Ajax widgets, Es2016, reactive programming and somewhat control which pages needs to be reloaded, I had to make a choice.

The list of choice is somewhat limited if keep only the 5 most popular ones. (yes I am resolutely not a pioneer of the JavaScript Jungle)

The framework selection

I made the following list :

  • Angular 2+ (they are increasing the major version number for each patch 😅)
  • React.js
  • AngularJS
  • Ember. Js
  • Vue.js
  • JQuery (it is a joke)

Selection criteria

I defined some selection criteria besides the popularity :

No code bloat : specifically to JavaScript, the syntax and the missing OOP native programming have been producing many frameworks with dumb syntax without any semantical and often syntaxical meaning. To overcome the limitations, many frameworks are using syntax sugar, making them a nightmare to memorize. The most ridiculous is the attempt to stick on these syntaxical blobs, some pseudo theorical terms.

A good framework should offer different levels of usages from the straightforward approach to build quickly and easily a website with the common use cases to the low-level approach where the experimented developer is able to tune the required details. What has been done in Laravel, Spring framework or Symphony are good samples.

Symphony framework is known as a huge galaxy. Many components, industry quality grade, but an overwhelming complexity if you start head on.

Therefore they have created a micro — framework called Silex to bootstrap an PHP application without the nasty details and it is deadly simple. If you want more complex things, the components behind Silex are the Symphony ones.

For a web framework, always study how do they handle forms. Especially a basic post form. It takes five minutes in plain HTML to build an (unsecured) form. How long does it take with this framework?

The same thing works for **Spring* and Spring boot.

The framework must have a business friendly licence. No doubt, no legal restriction for the future company. (by the way do you know you cannot build weapons software in Java, please stick to the line…)

An extensible / plug-ins architecture. I believe the success of a framework resides in the possibility to enable the necessary functionalities (aka feature toggling) during your project. Authentication, reactive programming, lazy loading, modularity.

The evaluation (aka trolling section)

Based on these selection criteria, here is my evaluation.

Disclaimer: I have a highly respect for the guys who wrote these frameworks and I do not doubt of their outstanding skills. AngularJS

I have experienced projects with AngularJS and I renounced since it is a deprecated technology. Too much code bloat, slow (I should rather say hard-to-tune) and all efforts are concentrated on the new Angular framework. Also, I think I could have a problem with my use case and disabling the AngularJS router.

Angular 2

Angular 2: I have received a training in January and wrote several prototypes since. I have been a huge fan of typescript, angular-cli. I was happy and thinking, they took the best ideas from the other frameworks and build a big melting pot.

Angular : melting pot

In Angular, you will find web components, uses template a la React.js, you have opt-in double binding, directives, modular architecture, lazy loading and so on and so on. But I progressively hate Angular for many details, slowing me down in my developments.

I really dislike their API and concepts to build forms. You have two choices, a template form design and programmatic form design. The first one is almost useless and the second one is deadly cumbersome.

In Angular, they decided to kill HTML and recreate it. How? Case-sensitive attributes and non HTML attributes. You cannot use your normal code editor on it. Beautifier tools not works or partially works. And worse of all, they conceive this awful syntax based on brackets, parens, Well, I think their are huge practitioners of the Brainfuck language.

Brainfuck language

Brainfuck language

The last issue I encountered is with their wish to produce an industrial, scalable (in the sense if I put more developers on my project, I maintain a stable learning and complexity curve). Yes, they provide dependency injection, IOC. But it really increases the learning curve.

 React.js

I really wanted to start with React.js. As far I have studied it, the framework seems full of promises, with some nice pluggable functionalities.

However at the time I began to use it, I received a lot of news. The concern is about the React.js license, the Facebook license (link1, link2, link3).

Since there is a threat for the future business (everything can be considered as a social network after all), I have rejected it.

 Ember.js

I have never tried Ember.js. Based in my readings, the framework is definitely worth of attention to build SPA applications but not for my use case. Note : during the writing of this post, I felt on that link, confirming that maybe I was wrong about ember.js

Vue.js

On Twitter, I am receiving a lot of feedback from happy users of Vue.js and I decided to give a try.

The syntax seems deadly simple.

Here is the brief of my experience :

I did not use vue-cli, I had to create my own packaging to adapt Vue.js to multipage architecture.

Code bloat: the Vue.js framework is really simple and the documentation quite good. The documentation for the plug-in vue-loader is quite good but I really hate the webpack syntax to enable it (rant..)

Learning curve: I did not try the most hard-core functionalities of Vue.js, though I am using vue-loader, a different template renderer (pug), transitions, a little bit components and lazy loading.

My biggest difficulty have been to maintain my js bundle as low as possible by producing chunks.

The second issue has been to understand why creating a view was creating an App and my component below using the render() function. However I think that Vue.js is easier than Angular. 2.

As in the previous example, the syntax is quite straightforward, no need to learn complex concepts to begin with.

The framework is also compatible with Typescript and the logic behind is quite simple.

Vue.js can be extended with several plug-ins and functionalities. I did not try all of them and the fact you are enabling them manually is comforting me in my approach.

Vue.js is not enforcing a particular programming paradigm(IOC, interfaces, Reactive programming, or. RxJS).

The only reproach I could formulate is a little fear about the Vue.js ecosystem. Please integrate existing libraries rather trying to recreate or mimic ReactJS libraries.

In conclusion, both of these frameworks are legitimate and have their lot of practitioners, and I don’t blame it. Vue.js has been my choice and I do not regret it, yet, since it has made my project easy, fun and effective.

I will try to provide more feedback in the following weeks especially on form editing, unkt testing and E2E testing.

Thanks for your attention

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How I switched my blog from OVH to Google Container Engine

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